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20130214
20130214
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: mark pinksy is the president and ceo of a nonprofit designed to align money and capital with political, economic, and social justice, opportunity finance network. ofm, and i am sure we will get to that. good to have you on the program. >> good to be here. tavis: i am not the only one continuing to do as much as we can on the issue of poverty, and this includes so much. what often does not get talked about is the fight back. i do not want to be guilty of only talking about the ugly and the bad but not talk about the significant work done by those who are trying to dig their way out over this hole that so many of all colors find themselves in. your company hopes to try to alleviate this pain and suffering. let me talk to you about what ofm does and get some specifics about the fight back on poverty. >> i appreciate your pain attention to this issue because it is one that often gets lost. opportunity finance network has what is called the community finance development institution
. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: fresh from addressing the nation, president obama opened a new campaign today to sell his secd-term economic plan. in turn, republicans dismissed most of his ideas as the failed policies of the past. the president flew south today, going directly to voters with his ideas for creating jobs and boosting the middle class. the post state of the union tour began in asheville, north carolina, at a plant that makes heavy-duty engines. he picked up where he had left off with his message the night before. >> our job as americans is to restore that basic bargain that says if you work hard, if you're willing to meet your responsibilities, you can get ahead. ( applause ) you can get ahead. doesn't matter what you look like, doesn't matter where you come
couldn't deny them intellectually. so i adopted them. >> all right. that was a clip from the pbs documentary "makers: women who make america. a film about the evolution of women's roles over the past 50 years. with us, the mother/daughter pair featured in the film, founding editor of "ms." magazine, letty pogrebin and writer abby pogrebin. thanks for being here again. >> thanks for having us. >> i look at that clip, and it's a generational thing. what was radical when you did that was actually pretty normal by the time i grew up. i'd see my dad sitting on the couch and go, can you get me a sandwich? everybody would turn to him and say, get it yourself! it wasn't that way. >> it was very radical at the time. i was working full time. so was he. yet i would come home and bake bread in order to make stuffing for the turkey. >> you didn't even think twice about it, did you? >> no. it just was some role i was born into. and when i became a feminist, i read myself into radicalism. i suddenly looked around and said, this is ridiculous. i can't justify it. and so my husband and i used to
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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